Encoding Class BlockedN-QueensCompetition

Class Tree
Description Problem description
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The blocked N-queens problem is a variant of the N-queens problem.
In the blocked N-queens problem we have an N X N board and N queens.
Each square on the board can hold at most one queen. Some squares on the
board are blocked and cannot hold any queen. A conflict arises when any
two queens are assigned to the same row, column or diagonal.

A blocked N-queens is an assignment of the N queens to the non-blocked
squares of the board in a conflict-free manner.

The input of the blocked N-queens problem specifies the blocked squares on the board, and the number N of queens.


Input Format
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The input of the blocked N-queens problem specifies the blocked squares on the board, and the number N of queens.

Input data are stored in a plain text file, The format of the file is as follows:

a. The file starts with N lines that define the size of the problem (the number of queens, and all row and column indices) using a predicate "num".
num(1).
num(2).
...
num(N).

b. The file then specifies the squares on the board that are blocked, using a predicate "block". Each line has the form "block(i,j).", meaning that the square in row i and column j is blocked.

Example input:
num(1).
num(2).
num(3).
num(4).
block(1,1).
block(2,2).
block(4,3).


Output format
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The solution must be encoded by a binary predicate "queen" , where "queen(i,j)" stands for "there is a queen in square (i,j)''.

For the example input given above, the following is a valid assignment:

queen(2,1) queen(4,2) queen(1,3) queen(3,4)

The corresponding answer set produced by a solver must contain exactly
these ground atoms of the form queen(i,j) .

Authors: Gayathri Namasivayam and Miroslaw Truszczynski
Affiliation: University of Kentucky
Email: {gayathri, mirek}@cs.uky.edu
Encodings
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